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Nov 28

Which one is the best for that sort of data? Of the other two, Ancestry's ethnicity analysis is generally more precise and interesting than FTDNA's. I've paid for tests for my four first cousins, a second cousin, my mom and both her siblings, and my kids. You can use your raw data at Promethease, but it's worth saying that AncestryDNA doesn't tell all the same SNPs (points on your DNA) that 23andme does, so not all data are the same as far as health reports go. I'm trying to decide what test to buy for my mother for Christmas, and I wanna maximize the value of what I spend while still trying to be cheap since I'm a college student, New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast, Press J to jump to the feed. One thing FTDNA has that some others don't have is the ability to retest the same samples. This is correct, although 23andme tests more health-related SNPs because they want to report that information. The results can be uploaded to gedmatch.com for free and they have a lot of different admixture tools. But, as I said, this can depend on you and what you're looking for. The test people are talking about when comparing with Ancestry and 23andMe is specifically their "Family Finder" test. And second, I've been really impressed with the upgrades at MyHeritage lately. The former is inferior. With that said, Ancestry's autosomal DNa testing has two things going for it. Every DNA company will show slightly different ethnicity from the same DNA. One, their method works better than the others, though 3rd cousin often means 6th cousin; people simply get the most help with actually connecting to their biological roots. I'd suggest that you consider FTDNA and/or AncestryDNA. FamilyTreeDNA - Family Finder DNA Test - Genetic Testing to Discover Your Ancestry 10/10 We have selected this product as being #2 in Best Dna Test Reddit of 2020 If you just want your admixture, your percentage of Neanderthal, and some health traits, 23andme. They are the top choice for Y-DNA testing, for example. They provide resources in the forms of projects, for people to collaborate on research. Ancestry would be best right now if you're most interested in matches; I would recommend 23andMe for the ancestry breakdown (there's very limited health info) only. I get constant pestering from people who collect "relatives" like postage stamps, a practice 23andMe outright encourages, I've even seen a man collecting future mates. But it's comparable. What KIND of test you want depends on what you want to know. You can't upload FTDNA to Ancestry, but it's still a great company, b/c it has a chromosome browser, etc., and you can upload the raw data to all of the sites below. Second, people are by far more likely to have posted their family trees, or what they know thereof, and that information is as important as the matches themselves. You can put a GEDCOM o fyour ancestry for people to examine. I prefer Ancestry. Someone more experienced can confirm, but afaik, the Ancestry raw data you can use on other sites for health data as well! The more people who test, the more data you can manipulate to learn about your ancestors. Cookies help us deliver our Services. But, as I said, this can depend on you and what you're looking for. There are three companies that offer similar services and are vetted by the genealogical community: AncestryDNA (Ancestry.com, NOT AncestryByDNA as /u/kellyo3us pointed out), 23andMe, FamilyTreeDNA. People also often tested to get the health results and have no interest in finding relatives. That will determine what kind of test you want, and may determine where you test. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. One thing FTDNA has that some others don't have is the ability to retest the same samples. (If you decide to upload the Ancestry raw data to FTDNA, there's a one time fee ($19) to get the match/chromosome browser access. Ancestry.comIf you then want to try FamilyTreeDNA.com, too, you can transfer those Ancestry.com results to FTDNA for only $39, much less than the cost of a full test from them.You'll also want to transfer your results to Gedmatch.com for free. ////, If you want to know your ethnic background it does not matter, and you'll learn the most from downloading your raw data, and uploading it at Gedmatch.com . If you're an adoptee I'd start with both Y DNA 37 or 67 markers, and Family Finder. 23andMe's prices recently went up, making their test about double the cost of the others. You're right that 23andme is less genealogically focused. I find it easier to use than the FT website. If you want to know more about the deep roots of a male line, or get past a male line genealogical brick wall, Y DNA 37 and then usually 67 marker testing, sometimes with a Big Y, and sometimes with family finder testing, would be your choice. ////, If you want to find your biological parents, people are getting the best results at Ancestry. Almost all of my new matches for the past year don't have trees or only have (private) parents in their trees. That is free. BTW, sorry if this has been asked a million times. When 23andMe was new, many people tested because it was an avante garde thing to do. Great advice! I asked my father go get an ancestry.com DNA test to enhance my ancestry.com tree and he got the anycestrybydna by mistake, which does nothing for me. Also, more people mean more opportunities to make genealogical connections. I used 23andme and was pleased with it, but a big chunk was missing as my grandfather belonged to one of the few reference populations they don't have :(. AncestryDNA doesn't make a point of it, but tests some of those SNPs anyway. Their tools (chromosome browser, DNA painting, etc.) Just want to correct one thing and add one thing. 23andMe has several things NOT going for them, and you would really only want to test there if you were trying to find your biological parents (and testing everywhere). Most of my matches don't have trees. And it's free to upload your raw DNA from another site too. FTDNA is $59.99 right now. Asian, curious about percentages of Denisovan, Korean, Han Chinese, Thai, etc in genome. Ditto Thompson. You must be prepared to do peoples' research for them.////. Many people havent done any genealogical research at all, and it's the platform where it's hardest to get even those who have to share the information you need. I myself have a few 5th and 7th cousins, and a lot of 13th cousins, who I know are 13th cousins because our common ancestors lived in New England, and a far greater number of matches with German names that I'll never identify how we're related, and matches from the southern United States that I'll probably never identify the common ancestor. Currently, I think Ancestry.com has the best value for what you get. If I test with Ancestry and upload to FTDNA, will I be able to purchase Y tests from FTDNA without needing to take a new sample? So, generally speaking, I think Ancestry.com is the top choice at the moment in terms of bang-for-your-buck.

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