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Nov 28

Your email address will not be published. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google This could yield some cool results. Rather than be secretive about the way he works, keeping the best tricks up his sleeve, Mark is happy to share his engineering experience. Distance from the speaker. Mark Opitz: Well, that’s what I used to do – but not so much these days because you’ve got lots and lots of tracks in the digital domain usually – but if you’re going to analogue tape I’d nearly always send the two mics to one track instead of keeping them separate. If you want to level up a notch and have more than one speaker and one microphone, you can mic up each speaker and record them to separate tracks. Move the mic closer to the driver if you want to hear more amp and less room, but watch out for the increased low-end from the proximity effect. Amp placement has a lot to do with your overall tone, too. One of the crucial factors is that the mics must remain set up in front of the centre of the speaker cone. This is going to vary greatly depending on the genre, the song, and your mood that afternoon, but the bottom line is this: if it doesn't sound right when you're standing in front of the amp, it's not going to sound any better when you try to record it. As always, you have to do a little experimenting. Spend some time experimenting with what you have available, and try to dial in your tone with the amp first and foremost. It’s amazing how many guitar players don’t realise that some of their speakers are not sounding as good as the others. It doesn’t matter what mic you use, just experiment with what you have, and use what sounds best. Required fields are marked *, This might be one of the best articles I’ve read on guitar amp mic’ing … and I’ve read a lot! Mark Opitz: Always. I’ve been using a single condenser mic for as long as I’ve been recording and now I’ve added the dynamic is a night and day difference. But if you’re not panning the signals to any great degree, it didn’t make a lot of difference. You can’t drop them back as far as the placement of the U47. Make sure they’re working by bringing them up in the control room monitors panned to the centre (mono). Just remember the age-old adage: it’s better to record a DI and not need it than to need it and not have it... Mic placement when recording electric guitar can vary quite a bit, especially when you start getting creative with your mic’ing techniques. AudioTechnology: Do these two mics usually act as one in terms of the mix? AudioTechnology: When you’re miking an amp with several speakers, does this technique always disregard the other speakers in the cabinet? Once the two mics are at similar volumes in the monitoring, flip one out of phase and fine tune their positioning until they start to substantially cancel each other out (the out of phase character should sound thin and horrible compared to the in-phase tone). It’s very simple. Another thing I always do now digitally is record a DI of the sound, but not for re-amping purposes. Just remember to use your ears, and trust your gut. You’ll notice we’ve put a Shure SM57 dynamic in front of the amp, as well as an AKG C414 large diaphragm condenser – two quite different sounding mics. The small inconsistencies in the two recordings help make it feel human and musical, while adding extra depth to the guitar tracks. Mark Opitz: Exactly, but not too far back because you’ve got to remember once you start moving back the focal length of the speaker’s going to change. If the capsules of both of your mics are the same distance away, they’ll “hear" the sound at the same time, which means they’ll be in phase. Typically I use the trusted and popular electric guitar amp mic, the Shure SM57. It is very well appreciated. That way we’re capturing the top end in both microphones, but without a sharp, unnaturally bright edge to the sound that can be produced by pointing the mic directly at the speaker. Mark Opitz: It’s because basically you want the signal hitting the diaphragm of each microphone at exactly the same time, i.e., phase coherently. Oops, looks like you forgot something. If you’re looking for a less expensive alternative to a Royer R-121, check out the Beyerdynamic M160 and Cascade Fathead ribbon mics. You can go right up against the centre of the cone or back the mics away… just so long as they remain in an X/Y setup and centred on the speaker. The distance from the speaker also causes significant changes to one’s tone. Try moving the mic toward the center of the driver for a more aggressive tone or toward the edge of the driver for a more mellow tone.

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