What Is Open In Mammoth Lakes, Senior High School Subjects Per Semester, Sonic 2 System Font, Images Of Green Chilli Plant, Thermometer That Doesn T Touch Skin, Push Press Vs Push Jerk, Solving Rational Equations Calculator, Troubled Times Green Day Lyrics, " />
Nov 28

The water we use each day in homes and businesses is fresh water, meaning it doesn’t come from an ocean. In countries such as Yemen, groundwater from erratic rainfall during the rainy season is the major source of irrigation water. Twenty percent of all fresh surface water is in one lake, Lake Baikal in Asia. As a result, the vast bulk of the water on Earth is regarded as saline or salt water, with an average salinity of 35‰ (or 4.5%, roughly equivalent to 34 grams of salts in 1 kg of seawater), though this varies slightly according to the amount of runoff received from surrounding land. The earth boasts of some of the largest water bodies including the oceans, lakes, and rivers that stretch across approximately two-thirds of its surface. The American Great Lakes account for 21 percent of the Earth’s surface fresh water. About 1.2 percent of this freshwater is considered surface water, which is essential to support life’s needs. The ratio of salt water to fresh water on Earth is around 50 to 1. The North American Great Lakes, which contain 21% of the world's fresh water by volume,[2][3][4] are the exception. Of the fresh water, only 0.3% is in liquid form on the surface. [11] The areas of greatest concentration of renewable water are: Variability of water availability is important both for the functioning of aquatic species and also for the availability of water for human use: water that is only available in a few wet years must not be considered renewable. Typically, fresh water is defined as water with a salinity of less than 1 percent that of the oceans - i.e. [16] Because the oceans that cover roughly 71% of the area of Earth reflect blue light, Earth appears blue from space, and is often referred to as the blue planet and the Pale Blue Dot. Only 3 percent of Earth’s water is fresh. The consequence of this is that many rivers in Australia and Southern Africa (as compared to extremely few in other continents) are theoretically impossible to regulate because rates of evaporation from dams mean a storage sufficiently large to theoretically regulate the river to a given level would actually allow very little draft to be used. However, fresh groundwater is of great value, especially in arid countries such as India. Although the total volume of groundwater is known to be much greater than that of river runoff, a large proportion of this groundwater is saline and should therefore be classified with the saline water above. The Great Lakes Basin is home to 33 million people. Freshwater represents only about three percent of all water on Earth and freshwater lakes and swamps account for a mere 0.29 percent of the Earth's freshwater. For example, as much as a quarter of Australia's limited renewable fresh water supply is found in almost uninhabited Cape York Peninsula. In other continents, runoff will occur after quite light rainfall due to the low rooting densities. Furthermore, about 2.6% of this freshwater is inaccessible for humans. An estimated 1.5 to 11 times the amount of water in the oceans may be found hundreds of kilometers deep within the Earth's interior, although not in liquid form. While nearly 70 percent of the world is covered by water, only 2.5 percent of it is fresh. We are continually investing in the infrastructure improvements necessary to keep your homes and businesses supplied with quality water service. Because groundwater recharge is much more difficult to accurately measure than surface runoff, groundwater is not generally used in areas where even fairly limited levels of surface water are available. Because water is much denser than any gas, this means that water will flow into the "depressions" formed as a result of the high density of oceanic crust (on a planet like Venus, with no water, the depressions appear to form a vast plain above which rise plateaux). Most lakes are in very inhospitable regions such as the glacial lakes of Canada, Lake Baikal in Russia, Lake Khövsgöl in Mongolia, and the African Great Lakes. Another twenty percent (about 5,500 cubic miles (about 23,000 cubic kilometers)) is stored in the Great Lakes. Since the low density rocks of the continental crust contain large quantities of easily eroded salts of the alkali and alkaline earth metals, salt has, over billions of years, accumulated in the oceans as a result of evaporation returning the fresh water to land as rain and snow. The oceanic crust is young, thin and dense, with none of the rocks within it dating from any older than the breakup of Pangaea. 97 percent of the water is salty and found in the oceans. Africa’s Lake Tanganyika is the second deepest freshwater lake, and holds the second largest volume of fresh water. The distribution of river runoff across the Earth's surface is very uneven. Lake Baikal in Russia is considered the deepest, oldest freshwater lake in the world. Although in warm periods such as the Mesozoic and Paleogene when there were no glaciers anywhere on the planet all fresh water was found in rivers and streams, today most fresh water exists in the form of ice, snow, groundwater and soil moisture, with only 0.3% in liquid form on the surface. Sometimes groundwater is located at a distance of tens or hundreds kilometers from the earth's surface. An estimated 1.5 to 11 times the amount of water in the oceans may be found hundreds of kilometers deep within the Earth's interior, although not in liquid form. The planet's fresh water is also very unevenly distributed. Even for other Australian rivers, a storage three times as large is needed to provide a third the supply of a comparable climate in southeastern North America or southern China. However, despite the fact that three-quarters of the Earth are made up of water, less than 3% of the water is fresh, non-saline water. It seems extraordinary that the water that supports all terrestrial, as well as aquatic, life on our planet is actually so scarce. At temperatures of 1,100 °C (2,010 °F) and extreme pressures found deep underground, water breaks down into hydroxyls and oxygen. Because the oceans that cover roughly 71% of the area of Earth reflect blue light, Earth appears blue from space, and is often referred to as the blue planet and the Pale Blue Dot. Of all the water on Earth, more than 99 percent of Earth's water is unusable by humans and many other living things! The water in the mantle is dissolved in various minerals near the transition zone between Earth's upper and lower mantle. Consequently, available nutrient levels in Australian and Southern African soils tend to be orders of magnitude lower than those of similar climates in other continents, and native flora compensate for this through much higher rooting densities (e.g. [7] Rivers and basins are often compared not according to their static volume, but to their flow of water, or surface run off.

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